COMMIT TO CHANGE

 

What to Listen To

 

Podcasts

Your Body Being Used

Where Prisoners Who Can't Vote Fill Voting Districts

When Civility is Used as a Cudgel Against People of Color
The value of civility is one of the few things Americans can all agree on—right? That's the common assumption. And yet it's an assumption that depends on everyone thinking they're a full member of the community.

The Power of Martin Luther King Jr.’s Anger
When Martin Luther King, Jr. was in high school, he won an oratorical contest sponsored by the Negro Elks. He and a beloved teacher were returning home in triumph, riding on a bus, when some white passengers got on. The white bus driver ordered King and his teacher to give up their seats, and cursed them. King wanted to stay seated, but his teacher urged him to obey the law. They had to stand in the aisle for the 90 miles back to Atlanta, Ga.

Opinion: My Father Stood for the National Anthem for the Same Reason Colin Kaepernick Sits
On May 23, 2018, the NFL unveiled a new policy stating that all of its athletes and staff "shall stand and show respect for the flag and the Anthem" if they're on the field. The following essay was published in August 2016, shortly after quarterback Colin Kaepernick's decision to kneel in protest during the national anthem.

When Calling the Po-Po is a No-No
Melissa DePino didn't take the infamous April video that showed two black men being handcuffed and ejected from a Philadelphia Starbucks—but she agreed to post it.

A Decade of Watching Black People Die CodeSwitch
The last few weeks have been filled with devastating news—stories about the police killing black people. At this point, these calamities feel familiar—so familiar, in fact, that their details have begun to echo each other.

The Limits of Empathy
There's a long tradition of white people trying to understand what it would be like to step into black people's shoes. But the journalist Grace Halsell went one step further: She attempted to step into black people's skin.

Becoming—Still Processing
Becoming, the best-selling memoir by the former first lady, Michelle Obama, is a study in what happens when the ways we see ourselves don't always line up with the ways that society sees us. In reading about her journey from high-achieving, self-possessed child in Chicago to the fraught glamour of her life in the White House, we marvel at the ways she balanced herself and her image in service of the country. And we discuss how Michelle Obama's memoir fits into a powerful lineage of black women navigating entirely new circumstances with curiosity, strength and grace.

Ask Code Switch: What About Your Friends?
We help our listeners understand how race and and its evil play cousin, racism, affect our friendships. And we're doing it with help from WNYC's Death, Sex & Money podcast. Be a good friend and listen.

Small Doses with Amanda Seales
Your favorite truth teller, comedian, Amanda Seales, is dropping gems with, “Small Doses,” a weekly podcast that brings you potent truths for everyday use:

Side Effects of White Women
Side Effects of Communication
 Side Effects of Being Misunderstood
 Side Effects of Professionalism
Side Effects of Being a Black Intellectual

Civil Rights in Canada
As the George Zimmerman case raises race and civil rights issues in America again, The Current brings you a Canadian civil rights tale. This is the story of a man whose fight against racial segregation in Canada in the 50s centred on the small Southern Ontario town of Dresden.

You are a Little Bit Racist
Is everyone a little bit racist? We are not born with prejudice. We learn it. It builds up throughout our lives, through our experiences and societal reinforcement.  Consciously or not, we are influenced by everything we see in the media, on the street, in schools, and in the workplace. And of course, our view of the world is greatly shaped by the things our friends, family, parents and grandparents say, and do.

Seeing White Podcast
Just what is going on with white people? Police shootings of unarmed African Americans. Acts of domestic terrorism by white supremacists. The renewed embrace of raw, undisguised white-identity politics. Unending racial inequity in schools, housing, criminal justice, and hiring. Some of this feels new, but in truth it’s an old story.

Wait There's More: The Erasure of Canada's History of Anti-Black Racism
A daily Global News podcast released every afternoon just in time for your commute home. The world moves way too fast and it’s easy to fall behind the news cycle. Host Tamara Khandaker takes you beyond the headlines to reveal the full story, explore new angles, ask tough questions, and talk directly to the people most affected by the big stories.

Reckoning with Racial Injustice
Featuring Dr. Bernice King, CEO of the King Center and daughter of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.; Rashad Robinson, President of Color of Change; Anthony Romero, Executive Director of the ACLU; and Dr. Phillip Atiba Goff, CEO of the Center for Policing Equity. The killing of George Floyd and other recent police violence against black people in the U.S. has sparked outrage and action the world over. Why is this moment so important, and how can we learn from it to end systemic racism? This virtual conversation is part of TED2020, hosted by head of TED Chris Anderson and current affairs curator Whitney Pennington Rodgers. It was recorded June 3, 2020.

In Recovery: Racism is an Addiction
As people gather to protest the murder of George Floyd, Breonna Taylor, Ahmed Arbery and so many Black people before them, Nzinga takes the opportunity to talk about how racism biologically and psychologically impacts our black and brown communities. Yes, this kind of chronic trauma leads to increased substance use disorders. But even more so, this episode explores how racism itself is the addiction of America. 

Pod Save the People
On Pod Save the People, DeRay Mckesson explores news, culture, social justice, and politics with Sam Sinyangwe, Kaya Henderson and De’Ara Balenger. They offer a unique take on the news, with a special focus on overlooked stories and topics that often impact people of color. There’s also a weekly one-on-one interview with DeRay and special guests, from singer/songwriter John Legend to Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi. The experts, influencers, and diverse local and national leaders who come on the show go deep on social, political, and cultural issues. New episodes every Tuesday.

Pod for the Cause
The Leadership Conference on Civil and Human Rights launched “Pod for the Cause” podcast to expand the conversation on critical civil and human rights challenges of our day: census, justice reform, policing, education, fighting hate & bias, judicial nominations, fair courts, voting rights, media & tech, economic security, immigration, and human rights. Through this expanded dialogue, we want to spur activism that drives change in our communities and country. Be sure to SUBSCRIBE to the show on your favorite podcast app and leave a 5-star review.

About Race: Things Can Only Get Better
Welcome to About Race with Reni Eddo-Lodge

Next Question with Katie Couric: Just Mercy Film
Katie Couric has questions. And on her new show, Next Question with Katie Couric, she’s determined to find answers—with a little help from the most captivating personalities in news, politics, and pop culture. For example: How did watching people play video games become a billion-dollar industry? Could CBD possibly be the key to overcoming pain and addiction? Does social media spur online radicalization? And what happens when at-home DNA tests reveal devastating family secrets? Join the award-winning journalist as she explores the people, movements, and issues changing our lives and redefining our world.

Still Processing
Step inside the confession booth of Wesley Morris and Jenna Wortham, two culture writers for The New York Times. They devour TV, movies, art, music and the internet to find the things that move them — to tears, awe and anger. Still Processing is where they try to understand the pleasures and pathologies of America in 2020.

Seeing White
Just what is going on with white people? Police shootings of unarmed African Americans. Acts of domestic terrorism by white supremacists. The renewed embrace of raw, undisguised white-identity politics. Unending racial inequity in schools, housing, criminal justice, and hiring. Some of this feels new, but in truth it’s an old story.

Jemele Hill is Unbothered
During the discussion, Hill announced that she’ll be telling her own story—and joining the Spotify lineup with her own original podcast, Jemele Hill is Unbothered.

Hear To Slay
Roxane Gay and Tressie McMillan Cottom unveil their new podcast, Hear to Slay, a black feminist perspective on celebrity, culture, politics, art, life, love—all the things they're obsessed with—and more.

The Appeal 
The Appeal is a podcast, hosted by Adam Johnson, on criminal justice reform, abolition and everything in between. Each week we will feature fascinating interviews with those covering, working in, and most affected by the American criminal system; from lawyers to activists to reporters to the formerly incarcerated. The Appeal will unpack the latest efforts to shine a light on––and radically rethink––the largest prison state in the world.

Justice In America
Justice in America, hosted by Josie Duffy Rice and Clint Smith, is a podcast for everyone interested in criminal justice reform— from those new to the system to experts who want to know more. Each episode we cover a new criminal justice issue. We explain how it works and look at its impact on people, particularly poor people and people of color. We’ll also interview activists, practitioners, experts, journalists, organizers, and others, to learn. By the end of the episode, you’ll walk away with a better understanding of what drives mass incarceration and what can fix it.

The Kinswomen
Introducing The Kinswomen Podcast—a series of candid conversations on race, racism, and allyship between women, hosted by Hannah Pechter and Yseult Polfliet.

Come Through
It’s an election year, and whether people want to admit it or not, race is at the center of every issue—healthcare, jobs, climate change, the media, and more. Join host Rebecca Carroll for 15 essential conversations about race in a pivotal moment for America. She talks to great thinkers, writers, and artists about faith, representation, white fragility, and how it’s all playing out in 2020.

Brené Brown with Ibram X. Kendi
I’m talking with professor Ibram X. Kendi, New York Times bestselling author of How to Be an Antiracist and the Director of the Antiracist Research and Policy Center at American University. We talk about racial disparities, policy, and equality, but we really focus on How to Be an Antiracist, which is a groundbreaking approach to understanding uprooting racism and inequality in our society and in ourselves.